CHINA'S CITIZENSHİIP POINTS SYSTEM MAY PREVENT A STUDENT FROM BEING ADMITTED TO SCHOOL

A college in Beijing did not want to take a student who won the school because his father was on the state's blacklist.

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A college in Beijing did not want to take a student who won the school because his father was on the state's blacklist. 

A high school student named Rao has passed a very difficult and competitive university exam in the country. But his family could not rejoice at this success. Because when the school learned that the boy's father owed 200,000 Yuan (£145,000) to a local bank and was on the ‘unreliable’ list, it was reported that the boy may not be admitted to the school.

Blacklists are a key part of China's controversial social credit system. In this way, the state strives to encourage citizens to behave in socially desirable ways. But the system has come under criticism for breaching privacy.

Controversy flared

The student's father did not immediately pay off the debt, but began paying off the possibility that his son would not be admitted to college. Many people in the country state that this practice is wrong, that the child cannot be punished because of his father's mistakes. But there are those who find the practice right.

Earlier, a court in Hebei province had advised private schools demanding tuition fees that people with poor credit grades should not take their children to school. The latest application is thought to be a reflection of this decision.


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